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Time in Freemasonry

Masonry is often thought of as a storied and mysterious fraternity. While it’s true that Masonry does have a long and interesting history, much of what makes the fraternity so special is its emphasis on timeless values like brotherhood, truth, and charity.

In this post, we’ll take a look at some of the ways that Masonic principles can help us make the most of our time.

Time in Freemasonry

Time in Freemasonry

Continuing the series on the broken column and the weeping virgin, this episode of Symbols and Symbolism explores Albert Mackey’s entry in the Encyclopedia of Freemasonry, where he discusses the figure of time in early American Freemasonry’s Jeremy Cross statue. The statue, a more recent addition to the collection of symbols, is very similar to the 24 inch gage and the hourglass.

The picture of Time, as a winged old man with the typical scythe and hour-glass, has been adopted as one of the Third Degree’s modern insignia. He is depicted struggling to untangle the ringlets of a crying virgin standing in front of him.

This seemingly endless effort, which Time undertakes, is designed to teach Freemasons that time, patience, and perseverance will enable them to complete the great purpose of a Freemason’s labor, which is to attain the true Word, the emblem of Divine Truth.

Thus, time serves as a metaphor for well-directed tenacity in the performance of duty in this context.

All Freemasons in the United States recognize this sign, which has a broken column, as a uniquely American creation.

Summary

In this episode of Symbols and Symbolism, we look at the symbolism of time. Time serves as a metaphor for well-directed tenacity in the performance of duty. The statue of Time is designed to teach Freemasons that time, patience, and perseverance will enable them to complete their labor.

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